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Animal Behavior Majors: You might be interested...

MARSHBIRD MONITORING PROGRAM COORDINATOR

Indiana Division of Fish & Wildlife

 

Location: Bloomington, IN                                                 

Term: full-time, intermittent (9 months)

Salary: $10.75/hour

Start Date: January 14, 2019

End Date: September 13, 2019 with the possibility for renewal

 

Description: This position is stationed at the Indiana Division of Fish Wildlife (DFW) Bloomington Field Office and is responsible for the implementation of an ongoing comprehensive volunteer marsh bird monitoring program at four sites in southern Indiana. Specific duties include:

 

  1. Volunteer Coordination
  • Train and coordinate 30 volunteers (Audubon chapters, universities) in marsh bird monitoring and habitat sampling.
  • Organize and distribute marsh bird and habitat sampling materials for training workshops that include field-based learning experiences; develop and administer tests in marsh bird identification.
  • Manage and distribute supplies and datasheets to volunteers and coordinate collection of these materials at the end of the field season.
  • Oversee volunteer marsh bird surveys and provide guidance when needed.
  • Collect and report volunteer hours and mileage on a bi-weekly basis to submit to funding sources.
  • Enter data into appropriate databases as instructed.
  • Report results to volunteers on an ongoing basis.
  • Analyze final data and write annual summary of results to distribute to volunteers and partners and coordinate an end-of-season meeting with volunteers.

 

  1. Survey Preparation & Fieldwork
  • Ground truth randomized survey points at four field sites using ArcGIS and GPS; prepare maps of field sites with survey points identified for distribution to volunteers.
  • Coordinate access to field sites with land managers.
  • Conduct surveys as needed when volunteers are unavailable.
  • Prepare field sites for volunteers, including the installation of water gauges and stakes at survey points.
  • Gather quotes and prepare purchase orders for supplies.
  • Prepare and apply for research permits to conduct fieldwork on federal properties.
  • Maintain trails to assist volunteers in accessing survey points.

 

Preferred Experience: Applicants must be organized and meticulous with the training of volunteers and the collection and submission of data.  Applicants must have excellent interpersonal and presentation skills and previous experience in bird identification and wildlife fieldwork. Applicants must be able to readily use a GPS unit. Previous teaching and GIS experience is desirable. Training in the standardized marsh bird monitoring protocol will be provided.

 

Additional Information: Duties are performed in an office locale and in a variety of field environments that may require accessing difficult habitats (wetlands) and exposure to adverse conditions (heat, rain, biting or stinging insects). Applicant must be able to work independently and in a team setting. Work days are variable, but will typically occur on weekdays with frequent early mornings during the field season. Applicant must provide his/her own transportation to and from the DFW Bloomington Field Office; travel to and from field sites will be provided using a state vehicle. Some overnight travel for training may be needed. The applicant will also have the potential to work on other projects related to nongame and game wildlife. This is an excellent opportunity for recent graduates to gain experience working for a wildlife and natural resource agency.

 

Application Process:  Email a cover letter and current resume or CV with three references to Allisyn Gillet, Nongame Bird Biologist [agillet (at) dnr.in.gov] by November 9, 2018.  Please label the e-mail as “Marshbird Monitoring Program Coordinator.” Please refer any questions to Allisyn Gillet at 812-334-1137 ext. 3400.

Posted:10/10/2018

Multispecies Ethnography:  How Studying Animals Has Challenged Theories of Being Human, Laura Ogden, Dartmouth College

Date: October 11, 2018
Time: 4pm

Location: SSRC, Woodburn Hall reception after the talk

In this talk, Laura Ogden presents a brief overview of multispecies research in Anthropology & Geography. Much of this research has sought to understand how being human is contingent upon relations with nonhuman beings. Nonhuman beings include biophysical entities, such as animals and plants, as well as the ways other entities, such as rocks and rivers, animate life’s processes of emergence and change. This work builds from several related endeavors in philosophy and social theory that seek to reconsider the boundaries of nature and society and decenter the human in ethics and political life. Ogden illustrates these themes using her research in the Florida Everglades with alligator hunters and her current project in Chilean Tierra del Fuego on environmental change and conservation.


Anthropologist Laura Ogden is a prominent voice in developing methods and theories of conducting and writing multispecies ethnography. Her award-winning work examines the interactions of human and nonhuman species -- such as alligators, grasses, hunters, and ecologists in the Florida Everglades -- and how they influence landscapes, ecological futures, cultures, class and race.

 

Posted: 10/11/2018
Paul Hardin will receive the inaugural Department of Biology Distinguished Alumni Award and will present a lecture on his work on circadian rhythms on Thursday October 18, 2018 at 4pm in Myers Hall Rm 130. Paul received his PhD from the IU Biology Department in 1987 for his work on sea urchin embryonic development (working with Professor William Klein). He went on to conduct his postdoctoral studies in Michael Rosbash’s lab at Brandeis University. It was here that Paul discovered what would turn out to be his life-long interest in chronobiology. His work as a postdoctoral fellow was instrumental in the awarding of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology to Michael Rosbash and Jeff Hall. Over his distinguished career, Paul has made a number of important discoveries that have been critical to our understanding of how circadian rhythms impact behavior. Paul is currently the John W. Lyons Jr. ’59 Chair in Biology at Texas A&M University.
Susan Hardin will present a lecture on her career as both a faculty member at the University of Houston and the founder and CEO of VisiGen Biotechnologies on Friday, October 19, 2018 at 11am in Simon Hall Rm 001. Susan received her PhD from the Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology (MCDB) program in the IU Biology Department in 1987. She worked with Professor William Klein and characterized the genomic structure of genes that encode several key sea urchin calcium binding proteins. She went on to do her postdoctoral studies in the Biochemistry Department at Brandeis University. Susan served as Director of Gene Technologies Lab at Texas A&M University before joining the faculty at the University of Houston. In 2000, she transitioned from academia to start Visigen Biotechnologies, a company focused on genome sequencing and analysis. Currently, Susan is involved in helping young scientists advance their careers within several academic institutions in Houston, Texas. 

Posted: 10/2/2018

NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program

Warm-water Aquatic Ecology

Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, USA

Summer 2019: May 19 to July 28

http://wilsonlab.com/reu/

 

Overview: We are excited to invite applications from undergraduate students to participate in a National Science Foundation supported summer Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program focused on the ecology of southeastern ponds, rivers, reservoirs, and estuaries.  Ten undergraduate students will work closely with a team of Auburn University faculty to explore aquatic ecosystems, complete a student-driven research project, participate in a variety of professional development and social activities, develop and lead an outreach project, and share their research findings in a symposium at the conclusion of the program.  Participants will work closely with our mentors to develop an interdisciplinary project involving complementary fields, such as community ecology, limnology, evolution, fisheries management, molecular biology, conservation, biogeochemistry, biodiversity, and microbiology.  The program will run from May 19 to July 28, 2019 (10 weeks).

 

Flyer: Please help us advertise the program by posting our flyer at your institution - http://wilsonlab.com/reu/pubs/reu_flyer.pdf  

 

Eligibility: All applicants who are interested in receiving NSF support must currently be a (1) U.S. citizen, U.S. national, or permanent resident and (2) an undergraduate freshman, sophomore, junior, or senior graduating no earlier than September 2019 or a high school senior that will start their undergraduate education the following fall semester after the REU program.  We are especially encouraging students from traditionally under-represented groups in biology (i.e., African-Americans, Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, other Pacific Islanders, students with disabilities, first generation college students, and U.S. veterans) as well as students from institutions with limited research opportunities (e.g., community colleges) or students in financial need to apply.  The online application is available at http://wilsonlab.com/reu/application.html

 

Support: Participants will receive a stipend ($5,500) plus housing and subsistence, financial assistance for travel to and from Auburn, and support for lab and field supplies.  For full consideration, on-line applications must be received by 1 February 2019.

 

International students: Although not financially supported by our REU Site, we are also open to including a few strongly motivated and self-funded international students in our REU Site research and professional development activities.


Contact information: For more information about the REU Site, visit http://wilsonlab.com/reu/ or contact Dr. Alan Wilson (wilson@auburn.edu).

Posted: 10/2/2018 from Email

PhD and MS Opportunities at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School: https://www.graduate.rsmas.miami.edu/admissions/phd-assistanships/index.html

All opportunities may not be listed (have students check back for more updates throughout the semester). If students are interested in applying, some faculty will take students on without having an Assistantship listed. Always a good idea to contact faculty!


Master of Professional Science (take the same courses as Ph.D. and MS students, but instead of a thesis/dissertation, you do an internship/research in the field with organizations such as NOAA, NPS, NGOs, etc. and 94% of students have a job in the field 6 months after graduation):

 

Degree Programs

o    Applied Remote Sensing

o    Aquaculture

o    Broadcast Meteorology

o    Coastal Zone Management

o    Exploration Science

o    Fisheries Management and Conservation

o    JD/MPS Program

o    Marine Conservation

o    Marine Mammal Science

o    Natural Hazard and Catastrophe Analytics

o    Tropical Marine Ecosystem Management

o    Underwater Archaeology

o    Climate and Society

o    Weather Forecasting

 

Potential students can apply to both Ph.D./MS and MPS degrees (no extra costs). Just make sure to click the button inside the PhD/MS application. Applications can be found here:

 

https://www.applyweb.com/miamigrd/index.ftl

 

Any questions, please ask! I'm more than willing to facetime, Skype, or just chat on the phone to help you out. We will also be visiting San Diego, Los Angeles, Hilo, Honolulu, and San Francisco for an upcoming recruiting trip along with being present at AGU and AMS (if interested in having us on campus or even Skype/Facetime in with students, let us know). Thank you for passing our information on!

 

Sincerely,

 

Josh Coco, Ed. D.

Executive Director, Advancement and Communication

Tel: (305) 421.4002

Fax: (305) 421.4711

Direct: jcoco@rsmas.miami.edu

 

University of Miami

RSMAS Campus – 105C

4600 Rickenbacker Causeway

Miami, FL 33149-1031

Posted: 10/1/2018

Title: Psychology of Learning P325

Time: 2:30-3:45 Tuesdays and Thursdays

Instructor: Kat Rodda

Location: PY226

PSY-P325 Psychology of Learning will be offered in Spring 2019, TR 2:30-3:45, for the first time in a very long time. The course counts towards the Environmental/Developmental/Cognitive Perspective requirement, and is very relevant ABEH majors interested in working with pets or other domesticated animals, or in zoos.

POSTED: 9/14/2018

CISAB is currently recruiting volunteers to help with our new outreach program. We have created set of simple demonstrations to reflect the integrative approach to studying Animal Behavior and will be showcasing these programs at SCIENCE FEST October 27th, 2018.

Our current demos consist of:

  • Evolution and ecology featuring mammal skulls and what they tell us about an animal
  • Mechanisms of behavior featuring the parts of a neuron
  • Environmental, developmental and cognitive approaches to behavior featuring a hands on comparison of your ability to remember number sequences with Ayumu the Chimpanzee (based on Chris Martin’s work at the Indianapolis Zoo)

CISAB will provide materials for the demos, instructions for how to walk visitors through each demo, and work with you to present during Science Fest.  We will also meet to go over the demos allowing you to familiarize yourself with the demos and practice before Science Fest. YOU DON’T NEED TO BE AN EXPERT in any of these areas in order to help out!

The more people who volunteer the more individualized time can be spent with the kids during the festival!!! Also it would help shorten duration of time you will be asked to volunteer. The festival runs from 9am-3pm (plus set up and break down). 

Our future goals are to get out in the public and present these demos in various settings to help entice children to learn more about the sciences. So, there will be more opportunities to volunteer in the future, but Science Fest is an important first step.

Please email me with any questions or if you would like to volunteer.

Charli Taylor

CISAB Assistant

chaatayl@indiana.edu

812-855-7639

Updated 10/11/2018

WonderLab General Animal Exhibits Internships 2018-2019

The exhibits department at WonderLab works diligently to provide and maintain the large variety of exhibits enjoyed by approximately 80,000 visitors per year. WonderLab’s live animal collection consists of reptiles, amphibians, arthropods ranging from honeybees to tarantulas, and a 300 gallon salt water aquarium. Animal Exhibits Interns receive hands-on experience in the many aspects of husbandry including habitat maintenance and repair, medicine distribution, medical and behavioral observation, food preparation as well as exhibit improvement and creation. Animal Exhibits Interns will also do educational outreach through the facilitation of hands-on interactions with museum guests doing live animal demonstrations.

2019 Summer Internship

  • May 13, 2019 - August 18, 2019
  • 3 general animal exhibits position available
  • 14-17 hours per week
  • Application Deadline: April 1, 2019

2019-2020 Academic Year Internship

  • August 19, 2019- May 8, 2020
  • 6 general Animal exhibits positions available
  • 7-10 hours per week
  • Application Deadline: June 1, 2019

Objective: To give student hands-on experience in husbandry, education and the many aspects of WonderLab’s animal exhibits department including the creation, improvement, and maintenance of animal exhibits.

Type: Unpaid unless eligible for federal work-study or for class credit

*Coral reef intern has a stipend but that is a separate application pool with its own requirements. Please see Coral Reef Intern Job Description

Responsibilities:

  • Daily Animal husbandry and maintenance of display habitats
  • Monitoring habitats for ideal conditions
  • Basic Medicine administration
  • Live animal demonstrations, education and outreach
  • Upkeep and organization of animal resources and care logs
  • Completion of 1-2 animal specific projects (Class Credit Interns only)

Preferred skills and qualifications for this position:

  • Interest in biology/animals
  • Reliable with a strong work ethic
  • Self-motivated
  • Excellent communication skills, especially written
  • Attention to detail and accuracy
  • Experience working with vertebrates and invertebrates a plus
  • Weekend availability
  • Enjoys researching and creating educational materials

If you are interested in the Animal Care Internship position please do the following:

  1. Send an introductory email, 2- professional references (note these are not letters of recommendation) resume and cover letter indicating which internship session

you are applying for to:

                Sam Couch - animalexhibits@wonderlab.org

                Animal Exhibits Manager

                WonderLab Museum of Health and Technology

  1. Fill out an application available on the WonderLab website at

http://wonderlab.org/about-wonderlab/college-student-internships/

Posted: 9/21/2018

"Harmony School​, a small, independent school in Bloomington, Indiana,​ seeks a permanent high school​ science teacher. The ideal candidate will relish the challenge of designing their own “dream” curricula in environmental, biological, and physical sciences. They will love working with young people inside and outside the classroom and appreciate the variety of ways that students learn. Harmony utilizes a shared decision-making, project-based, holistic educational approach, which requires personalized involvement in the academic, social-emotional growth and development of our students. Looking for​ qualified applicants, certification not required, with experience teaching science and enthusiasm for working with adolescents. Please send resume to P.O. Box 1787, Bloomington, IN 47402 or harmonyoffice@harmonyschool.org"

 

http://www.harmonyschool.org/high_school_science_job/

Posted 9/21/2018

Field Projects International is a not-for-profit organization offering hands-on field-based training for undergraduates and recent graduates at various biodiverse research stations around the world. These opportunities are ideal for those who already are, or are considering becoming, majors in biology, anthropology, ecology, environmental science, zoology, or pre-veterinary science.

Students may be able to receive credit for participation in select courses and other field programs. We also offer scholarships for students to attend our courses for free. Deadlines for applications for all of our programs are soon approaching, and spots are given away on a first come, first serve basis, so applying early is always an advantage.

Please scroll below for links to all of the opportunities available this upcoming summer. If you have questions, please contact us directly at this address: info@fieldprojects.org.

Sincerely,

Mrinalini Erkenswick Watsa, PhD
President, Field Projects International
mini@fieldprojects.org
Research Associate
Department of Anthropology, Washington University in Saint Louis

Information Bank:

** Visit our website: https://fieldprojects.org

**Upcoming Research Assistantships (Note: The deadline to complete the online application is April 15, 2019):

Posted: 9/19/2018

Operation Wallacea runs conservation research expeditions to 14 different countries worldwide. These expeditions are designed with specific wildlife conservation aims in mind - from identifying areas needing protection, through to implementing and assessing conservation management programmes.

The short video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zuluQAneG-I&feature=youtu.be provides an introduction to the research program and details about the opportunities offered by this program both for supporting academic research and also for students to gain some field experience as interns.

The research assistant projects are designed for university students, and vary in length from two to eight weeks dependant on location.

Dr. Tim Coles
Project Director and Founder, Operation Wallacea (www.opwall.com)
Publisher of Biodiversity Science (www.biodiversityscience.com)
Senior Research Associate, Zoology Department, University of Oxford

Posted: 9/14/2018

Job opening:

Research Associate

Genomics Laboratory, The Center for Genomics and Bioinformatics

Indiana University Bloomington (IUB) 

The IUB Center for Genomics and Bioinformatics (CGB), https://cgb.indiana.edu/, seeks a Research Associate to serve in the genomics lab. 

Duties include the performance and documentation of bench experiments, organization and maintenance of lab space, and other lab assignments. The work will involve BSL2 samples such as human body fluids and pathological specimens. BSL2 training will be provided. The position is supported by the IU Precision Health Grand Challenge program, https://grandchallenges.iu.edu/precision-health/index.html. The initial employment term is one year with potential extension depending on funding availability, programmatic need, and job performance. 

Position Requirements:  Must have a BS or MS in the biological sciences. Must have demonstrated experience in molecular biology research including nucleic acid extraction and manipulation. Must have good planning skills and attention to detail. Prior experience in lab automation and next-generation sequencing is desirable, but not required.

Background:  The Center for Genomics and Bioinformatics acts as a service facility that provides IU faculty access to genome technologies and bioinformatic support; provides consulting and training that supports the development of genome-enabled research programs and grant proposals; and develops new genome technologies and bioinformatics tools that are not easily purchased as a fee for service elsewhere.

Applications should be submitted by 9/30/2018 to ensure full consideration, but will continue to be considered until the position is filled. Interested candidates should review the job description and submit application materials online at http://indiana.peopleadmin.com/.  

Questions about the position should be directed to: Scott Michaels, Director, CGB (michaels@indiana.edu).  

Indiana University is an equal employment and affirmative action employer and a provider of ADA services. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to age, ethnicity, color, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, genetic information, marital status, national origin, disability status or protected veteran status. 

POSTED 9/14/2018

Danta is pleased to announce our 2019 field courses in tropical biology. Our course are intended for undergraduates or early graduate level students who have a keen interest in tropical ecosystems and conservation, but have little or no experience of working in a tropical environment. Participants may enroll on either a credit or non-credit basis.

DANTA operates on a cooperative and collaborative teaching model with multiple international instructors on each course. Co-instruction allows for more individualized instruction, and the sharing and appreciation of different ideas. Visiting scholars are often incorporated into the curriculum to broaden student experience.

As much of our advertising is done by word-of-mouth, we encourage you to spread the word by forwarding this information to students or friends who may be interested in our programs.

For more information, please visit our website at www.DANTA.info and/or email conservation@danta.info. For an alumni perspective on our programs, please see our blog DANTAisms - http://dantablog.wordpress.com/.

Methods in Primate Behavior and Conservation

Dates: Winter Session: December 28 –January 12, 2019; Summer Session: July 3 – July 18, 2019

Program Fee: $2600

Application deadline: Winter Session: December 1, 2018; Summer Session: June 1, 2019

Course Description
This course is designed to provide students with field experience in primate behavior, ecology, and conservation. This course will be held at Osa Conservation’s Piro Reseach Station in Costa Rica’s spectacular Osa peninsula. As the one of the largest tracts of rain forest north of the Amazon (roughly 400,000 acres in the Osa Conservation Area), it is renowned for high species diversity. It is one of only a few places in Costa Rica that has jaguar, puma, sea turtles and four species of monkey (mantled howler monkey, black-handed spider monkey, white-faced capuchin and squirrel monkey).

The learning experiences for the course fall into four main categories: field exercises, seminars, lectures, and applied conservation. The field exercises and seminars provide instruction and experience in: (1) methods of measuring environmental variables, including assessment of resource availability, (2) methods of collecting and analyzing the behavior of free-ranging primates, (3) assessments of biodiversity and (4) techniques for estimating population size. Lecture topics will cover the behavior and ecology of Old and New World primates from an evolutionary perspective. Selected lecture topics include primate sociality, feeding ecology, taxonomy, rain forest ecosystems and conservation. Service learning is a large component of all our programs. Students will gain experience in applied conservation through participation in Osa Conservation’s reforestation, sustainable agriculture and wildlife monitoring programs (big cat and sea turtle).

During the course participants will visit a wildlife rehabilitation center, sustainable chocolate plantation, and take a boat tour of the Golfo Dulce for dolphin viewing and snorkeling. We overnight on the Boruca Indigenous Reserve where we will learn about the community and their traditional lifeways, and help with needed projects. Every effort is made to implement eco-friendly and socially responsible practices into our day-to-day operations, field courses and overall mission.

Enrollment is limited to 15 students. The course is open to both credit and non-credit seeking students. University credit can be arranged through your home institution.

 Primate Behavior and Conservation

Dates: June 5-July 1, 2019
Program Fee: $3500
Application deadline: May 1, 2019

Course Description
This course is designed to provide students with field experience in primate behavior, ecology, and conservation. The course will be conducted at Osa Conservation‘s Piro Research Station in Costa Rica’s spectacular Osa peninsula. As the one of the largest tracts of rain forest north of the Amazon (roughly 400,000 acres in the Osa Conservation Area), it is renowned for high species diversity. It is one of only a few sites in Costa Rica that contain 4 species of primate (mantled howler monkey, black-handed spider monkey, white-faced capuchin and squirrel monkey). Four species of sea turtle also nest along its beaches. Please help us protect this unique region which is of international conservation concern.

The learning experiences for the course fall into five main categories: field exercises, independent research, discussions, lectures and applied conservation. The first half of the courses is devoted to learning ecological field techniques, while in the second half students develop, carry out and present data from their independent research projects. Many of our participants have gone on to present their work at national and regional conferences. The field exercises and seminars provide instruction and experience in:(1) methods of measuring environmental variables, including assessment of resource availability, (2) methods of collecting and analyzing the behavior of free-ranging primates, (3) assessments of biodiversity and (4) techniques for estimating population size. Lecture topics will cover the behavior and ecology of Old and New World primates from an evolutionary perspective. Selected lecture topics include primate sociality, feeding ecology, taxonomy, rain forest ecosystems, conservation, climate change and sustainability. Participants gain experience in applied conservation through participation in Osa Conservation’s reforestation,and sea turtle breeding and monitoring programs.

During the course participants will visit a wildlife rehabilitation center, sustainable chocolate plantation, and take a boat tour of the Golfo Dulce for dolphin viewing and snorkeling. We overnight on the Boruca Indigenous Reserve where we will learn about the community and their traditional lifeways, and help with needed projects. Every effort is made to implement eco-friendly and socially responsible practices into our day-to-day operations, field courses and overall mission.

Enrollment is limited to 15 students. The course is open to both credit and non-credit seeking students. University credit can be arranged through your home institution.

Wildlife Conservation and Sustainability

Dates: December 28 – January 12, 2019
Program fee: $2600
Application deadline: December 1, 2019

Course Description
The proximate and ultimate causes of declines of rain forest habitats and biodiversity will be examined through a combination of direct observations in the field, lectures, and critical reviews of the literature. Topics will include the role of hunting, logging, agriculture, disease, predation, expanding human populations and their consumption of natural resources as they affect forest and biodiversity conservation. Emphasis will be on sustainable solutions and how today’s human societies can endure in the face of climate change, ecosystem degradation and resource limitations.

The majority of the course will be conducted at Osa Conservation‘s Piro Research Station in Costa Rica’s spectacular Osa Peninsula. As one of the largest tracts of rain forest north of the Amazon (roughly 400,000 acres in the Osa Conservation Area), it is renowned for high species diversity. It is one of only a few sites in Costa Rica that contain 4 species of primate (mantled howler monkey, black-handed spider monkey, white-faced capuchin and the Central American squirrel monkey). Four species of sea turtle also nest along its beaches. Students gain hands-on experience through participation in Osa Conservation’s sustainable agriculture, wildlife monitoring and reforestation programs. Problems of various land-use activities will be evaluated with side trips to an oil palm plantation, a coffee plantation, and small-scale agricultural plots.

 During the course participants will visit a wildlife rehabilitation center, sustainable chocolate plantation, and take a boat tour of the Golfo Dulce for dolphin viewing and snorkeling. We overnight on the Boruca Indigenous Reserve where we will learn about the community and their traditional lifeways, and help with needed projects. Every effort is made to implement eco-friendly and socially responsible practices into our day-to-day operations, field courses and overall mission.

Enrollment is limited to 15 students. The course is open to both credit and non-credit seeking students. University credit can be arranged through your home institution. 

 

Posted 8/28/2018

A former ABEH graduate is completing an animal care internship at David Copperfield’s Musha Cay resort this winter. Her employer is accepting applications for new interns for 2019 (either 6 months or a year appointment). You must have completed a degree by the time the job starts. A job description is attached here, and you can view some info on the resort at this link: http://www.mushacay.com 

Job description

Updated: 8/31/2018

Marine science career development opportunity in South Africa

The course operates year round. The course is structured around several SCUBA-based research projects that we run or collaborate with, using the projects as tools to teach practical and theoretical skills while allowing students to actively participate in the research. Some projects are general long term monitoring projects, while others aim to answer specific questions, such as the impact of grazer density on kelp abundance, or the patterns of interaction between individuals in fish shoals. We cater to students of various levels of experience and interest, so the course begins with scuba courses and refreshers to get everyone comfortable again in the water. Students are then introduced to the science component with some citizen science initiatives. Concepts are progressively built upon by introducing projects over the course of the next weeks that utilise more standardised research methods. Lectures and workshops are also provided that introduce concepts like biodiversity, and how these are measured and compared, with some hands on training in software like R, QGIS and Coral Point Count. We also run some boat based observation trips and teach an introductory freediving course.

Check out our website http://www.caperadd.com or drop us an email info@caperadd.com for more information on what we offer.

Check back regularly for new updates

CISAB to Partcipate in Science Fest October 27, 2018

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RACE AGAINST A CHIMPANZEE Chris Martin, a research scientist and CISAB affiliate at the Indianapolis Zoo has developed computer programs that allow us to learn about chimpanzee and orangutan intelligence. He has taught chimpanzees to do simple tasks, and then measured how quickly they can complete those tasks. At this station, you will learn how to do a simple task, and then race against the clock to see if you can perform the task more quickly than a chimpanzee.By studying animals in zoos and other settings, researchers are supporting conservation and helping animals in the wild. This research can benefit animals in captivity, too, by keeping their minds stimulated. We hope you will join us to learn more about research on animal intelligence, and how it can be used to help animals in captivity and in the wild.
Pictured here is items used during What can you tell from a skull? A coyote and deer skull featured.
WHAT CAN A SKULL TELL US? All animals develop unique ways to survive and thrive in their environments. By looking at an animal’s skull, you can see some important features and learn a lot about how that animal lived. For example, you can tell whether the animal was a predator or prey. You can also determine whether it was a carnivore, omnivore or herbivore, and how much it used its eyesight, hearing and sense of smell in its daily life. Stop by this station to see and interact with skulls from several mammals native to Indiana. You might be surprised to see how much you can learn about an animal, just by looking at its skull!
This text appears when someone is browsing using assistive technologies.
BUILD A NEURON Are you curious about how your brain controls your thoughts and movements? How does your brain tell your hand to pick up a pencil? How do your feet know when to take the next step? Come learn about neurons, which are the cells in your body that send messages from your brain to all the other parts of your body.During this activity, you will use pipe cleaners to build and assemble the parts of a neuron. You will then learn how neurons work together by creating chains and observing how signals move through the body, passing from one neuron to the next.