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Animal Behavior Majors: You might be interested...

Posted: 7/31/2018
Aquarist - Cabela's Lead

Job Summary

Job Type: Part-time (10-12hrs per week)

Salary: $15-18 per hour based on experience

General Description:

Performs live exhibit maintenance for aquariums in residential and commercial settings. Includes providing basic animal husbandry for a variety of freshwater and saltwater fishes, maintaining components of filtration systems, monitoring water quality, and cleaning aquatic habitats. Ensures high quality service is delivered to our clients.

Approximate % of time: Principal Job Duties and Responsibilities

70%: Performs routine husbandry, filter operation and exhibit maintenance tasks for assigned aquariums and their specimens. Includes, but not limited to, regular feedings, health and behavioral observations, water quality monitoring and filter maintenance, and exhibit cleaning. Responsible for aquascaping and general aesthetics of exhibits.

15%: Specialized aquarium cleaning involving entrance into exhibits with SCUBA.

10%: Performs preventative maintenance/repairs on live exhibit filtration.

5%: Responsible for the hygiene of areas surrounding aquariums and filtration.

Requirements:

Education B.A. or B.S. in Biology or related field with course-work in zoology, aquatic biology and chemistry preferred. Experience One year in a retail aquarium store, hatchery or public aquarium preferred.

Valid Open Water dive certification is required as some of the aquariums are large and require entry via SCUBA. Candidates with dive certification in process will be considered.

Aptitude in science and art/design is preferred. May be required to work unusual hours or on unscheduled days during emergency type circumstances. Strong interpersonal skills needed. Must have good hearing, visual acuity, and be able to lift 50 lbs.

NSF - International Research Experience for Students (IRES) - 2017 - 2020

NSF International Research Experiences for Students - 2017 - 2020

"Integrating ecological sciences and environmental philosophy for biocultural conservation in the temperate and sub-antarctic Ecoregions of southern South America"

Principal Investigator: Jaime E. Jiménez
Co-investigators: James Kennedy and Ricardo Rozzi

Application for the Second Cohort is now open - deadline is August 15, 2018.

 

Cross-cutting interdisciplinary research and integration of ecology and biocultural conservation in the world's southernmost forest

Conservation of biological and cultural diversity requires addressing social and ecological dimensions of environmental problems to stimulate integration of scientific research, policy development, and conservation strategies. With a novel biocultural conservation approach integrating ecological sciences, arts and environmental philosophy, students will participate in theoretical and field-based research conducted in the southernmost temperate region of southwestern South America in UNESCO's Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve (CHBR), Chile. This National Science Foundation (NSF) funded International Research Experience for Students (IRES) was awarded to the University of North Texas (UNT) Sub-Antarctic Biocultural Conservation Program (SCBP) to provide 6-week international research experiences in the Omora Ethnobotanical Park (OEP) and the CHBR for 18 students over three years. The SBCP, is jointly coordinated by the UNT in the US, and the Universidad de Magallanes (UMAG), and the Millennium Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity (IEB), and the OEP in Chile. Mentored by Chilean and U.S. researchers, students will actively engage in cross-cutting research in the context of global climate change integrating bryophyte and bird ecology, impact of invasive species, and the effects of water and air quality on aquatic invertebrates along altitudinal gradients.

UNT has a world renowned interdisciplinary program that integrates environmental sciences, philosophy and the arts. IEB is a prominent Latin American research institution that includes six universities and three long-term ecological research sites (LTER). UMAG, Chile's southernmost university and one of the top ranked, played a key role in the creation of the CHBR, and has conducted long-term ecological research at OEP for over two decades. Through interdisciplinary research activities conducted by an international team of scholars with complementary strength, in pristine natural and unique cultural environments, U.S. students will acquire critical skills to address pressing regional conservation issues triggered by global socio-environmental change in an international setting. The program will focus on biodiversity assessments, ecological processes, threats to biodiversity conservation, socio-cultural perspectives on biodiversity, conservation and watershed protection policies, and practices of formal education related to biocultural diversity in southern Chile. The objective of the program is to familiarize students with decision-making processes, engage them in regional educational programs focused on social and ecological well-being. Selected students will be exposed to new interdisciplinary methods and approaches for a more holistic understanding of the links between social and ecological systems.

Background

Program Overview

Components and Eligibility

Online application

Register Now - Early Bird Registration Closes August 31
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We are happy to announce that registration for the 2018 Natural Areas Conference is OPEN.
This event is unique.

It is completely dedicated to the needs of the community of natural areas practitioners.
We bring together leaders from across our profession to offer the information you need to excel in your  work: cutting-edge science, emerging strategies, and hands-on understanding - plus collaborative exchange with the community of your fellow professionals.
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This year's conference offers programming that directly engages with attendees on the topics they most want to hear about.
 
 
A few of the in-depth symposia you can expect include:

  • Leveraging data and technology to inform natural areas management
  • Growing regional partnerships to address invasive species and strengthen ecosystem resilience
  • Conserving and managing karst systems
  • Collaboration in urban natural areas restoration
  • Using the native seed strategy in restoration work
NEW for 2018: ID Workshops
We are offering six ID workshops to strengthen natural areas practitioners' grasp of the fundamentals of their work: Invasive Plants, Invasive Insects, Midwestern Ferns, Grasses, Sedges and using Digital Herbarium Tools.
 
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You can attend a full-day, 
pre-conference workshop
 on BMPs for Pollinators featuring Xerces Society, or sit at the Pollinator Roundtable to discuss the latest thinking on the subject of pollinators in natural areas management.
 
Our Keynote Speaker is Professor Scott Russell Sanders, award-winning author of A Conservationist Manifesto and Stone Country: Then & Now. We expect a full house for our Closing Plenary, featuring Former National Park Service Director Jonathan Jarvis and Dr. Gary Machlis, co-authors of the book The Future of Conservation in America: A Chart for Rough Water
Field Workshops
 
And we're offering 7 half-day Field Workshops to get you out onto the land to engage in the strategies you'll be hearing about. Choose from:
  • Creating bat habitat in oak woodland and limestone glades
  • Restoring hardwood forest from former agricultural land in the Hills of Gold
  • Canoeing through karst caves on the Lost River
  • Improving wetland quality at the Beanblossom Nature Preserve
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Registration grants you access to all of our symposia and oral presentations - plus the NAA Awards Dinner and the Poster Reception.
 
There's SO much more.
 
Find out more about the conference by visiting our conference page. There you'll find information about all our programming and events, student opportunities and programming, and you can also reserve your room at the Biddle Hotel in the Indiana Memorial Union, our conference venue.
 
 
Don't wait. Early Bird registration closes August 31, and Workshops and Field Workshops have limited capacity.
We'll see you in Bloomington!

Posted 6/1/2018

Danta is pleased to announce our 2018 field courses in tropical biology. Our course are intended for undergraduates or early graduate level students who have a keen interest in tropical ecosystems and conservation, but have little or no experience of working in a tropical environment. Participants may enroll on either a credit or non-credit basis.

 

DANTA operates on a cooperative and collaborative teaching model with multiple international instructors on each course. Co-instruction allows for more individualized instruction, and the sharing and appreciation of different ideas. Visiting scholars are often incorporated into the curriculum to broaden student experience.

 

As much of our advertising is done by word-of-mouth, we encourage you to spread the word by forwarding this information to students or friends who may be interested in our programs.

For more information, please visit our website at www.DANTA.info and/or email conservation@danta.info You can find us on Facebook and Twitter. For an alumni perspective on our programs, please see our new blog DANTAisms http://dantablog.wordpress.com/.

 

 

Methods in Primate Behavior and Conservation

Dates: July 13–July 28, 2018

Program Fee: $2600

Application deadline: Summer Session: June 15, 2018

Course Description

This course is designed to provide students with field experience in primate behavior, ecology, and conservation. This course will be held at Osa Conservation’s Piro Reseach Station in Costa Rica’s spectacular Osa peninsula. As the one of the largest tracts of rain forest north of the Amazon (roughly 400,000 acres in the Osa Conservation Area), it is renowned for high species diversity. It is one of only a few places in Costa Rica that has jaguar, puma, sea turtles and four species of monkey (mantled howler monkey, black-handed spider monkey, white-faced capuchin and squirrel monkey).

 

The learning experiences for the course fall into four main categories: field exercises, seminars, lectures, and applied conservation. The field exercises and seminars provide instruction and experience in: (1) methods of measuring environmental variables, including assessment of resource availability, (2) methods of collecting and analyzing the behavior of free-ranging primates, (3) assessments of biodiversity and (4) techniques for estimating population size. Lecture topics will cover the behavior and ecology of Old and New World primates from an evolutionary perspective. Selected lecture topics include primate sociality, feeding ecology, taxonomy, rain forest ecosystems and conservation. Service learning is a large component of all our programs. Students will gain experience in applied conservation through participation in Osa Conservation’s reforestation, sustainable agriculture and wildlife monitoring programs (big cat and sea turtle).

 

During the course participants will visit a wildlife rehabilitation center, sustainable chocolate plantation, and take a boat tour of the Golfo Dulce for dolphin viewing and snorkeling. We overnight on the Boruca Indigenous Reserve where we will learn about the community and their traditional lifeways, and help with needed projects. All within country travel is in cooperation with Planet Conservation, our sustainable travel partner. Every effort is made to implement eco-friendly and socially responsible practices into our day-to-day operations, field courses and overall mission.

 

Enrollment is limited to 15 students. The course is open to both credit and non-credit seeking students. University credit can be arranged through your home institution.

 

Wildlife Conservation and Sustainability

 

Dates: July 13-28, 2018

Program fee: $2600

Application deadline: June 15, 2018

 

Course Description

 

The proximate and ultimate causes of declines of rain forest habitats and biodiversity will be examined through a combination of direct observations in the field, lectures, and critical reviews of the literature. Topics will include the role of hunting, logging, agriculture, disease, predation, expanding human populations and their consumption of natural resources as they affect forest and biodiversity conservation. Emphasis will be on sustainable solutions and how today’s human societies can endure in the face of climate change, ecosystem degradation and resource limitations.

 

The majority of the course will be conducted at Osa Conservation‘s Piro Research Station in Costa Rica’s spectacular Osa Peninsula. As one of the largest tracts of rain forest north of the Amazon (roughly 400,000 acres in the Osa Conservation Area), it is renowned for high species diversity. It is one of only a few sites in Costa Rica that contain 4 species of primate (mantled howler monkey, black-handed spider monkey, white-faced capuchin and the Central American squirrel monkey). Four species of sea turtle also nest along its beaches. Students gain hands-on experience through participation in Osa Conservation’s sustainable agriculture, wildlife monitoring and reforestation programs. Problems of various land-use activities will be evaluated with side trips to an oil palm plantation, a coffee plantation, and small-scale agricultural plots.

 

During the course participants will visit a wildlife rehabilitation center, sustainable chocolate plantation, and take a boat tour of the Golfo Dulce for dolphin viewing and snorkeling. We overnight on the Boruca Indigenous Reserve where we will learn about the community and their traditional lifeways, and help with needed projects. All within country travel is in cooperation with Planet Conservation, our sustainable travel partner. Every effort is made to implement eco-friendly and socially responsible practices into our day-to-day operations, field courses and overall mission.

 

Enrollment is limited to 15 students. The course is open to both credit and non-credit seeking students. University credit can be arranged through your home institution.

Posted: 4/21/2018

Marine science career development opportunity in South Africa

Seats in the 2-week and 4-week Cape RADD marine field courses are quickly filling for the months of June, July and August. Though the course operates year round, these are the more popular months and space is limited! The course is structured around several SCUBA-based research projects that we run or collaborate with, using the projects as tools to teach practical and theoretical skills while allowing students to actively participate in the research. Some projects are general long term monitoring projects, while others aim to answer specific questions, such as the impact of grazer density on kelp abundance, or the patterns of interaction between individuals in fish shoals. We cater to students of various levels of experience and interest, so the course begins with scuba courses and refreshers to get everyone comfortable again in the water. Students are then introduced to the science component with some citizen science initiatives. Concepts are progressively built upon by introducing projects over the course of the next weeks that utilise more standardised research methods. Lectures and workshops are also provided that introduce concepts like biodiversity, and how these are measured and compared, with some hands on training in software like R, QGIS and Coral Point Count. We also run some boat based observation trips and teach an introductory freediving course.

Check out our website http://www.caperadd.com or drop us an email info@caperadd.com for more information on what we offer.

Posted: 4/9/2018

Seminar in Animal-Computer Interaction

INFO 590-35981

Tuesday evenings, 5:45pm-8:15pm, Luddy Hall Room 1104

Christena Nippert-Eng, Professor of Informatics

...A readings and discussion seminar on this dynamic, emergent field.

See flyer

Updated 5/14/2018

2018-2019 Academic year Internship – Monday, August 13, 2018- May 5

Objective: To give student hands-on experience in husbandry, education and the many aspects of WonderLab’s animal exhibits department including the creation, improvement, and maintenance of animal exhibits.

Type: Unpaid (unless eligible for federal work-study) or for class credit

Time Commitment: Two, weekly shifts totaling 7 hours plus research time

Responsibilities:

  • Animal care and maintaining display habitats
  • Monitoring habitats for ideal conditions
  • Live animal demonstrations, education and outreach
  • Upkeep and organization of animal resources and care logs
  • Completion of 1-2 animal specific projects (Academic Year, Class Credit Interns only)

Preferred skills and qualifications for this position:

  • Interest in biology/animals
  • Reliable with a strong work ethic
  • Self-motivated
  • Excellent communication skills, especially written
  • Attention to detail and accuracy
  • Experience working with vertebrates and invertebrates a plus
  • Weekend availability
  • Enjoys researching and creating educational materials

If you are interested in the Animal Care Internship position please do the following:

1. Send an introductory email, resume and cover letter indicating which internship session

you are applying for to:

               Sam Couch - animalexhibits@wonderlab.org

               Animal Exhibits Manager

               WonderLab Museum of Health and Technology

2. Fill out an application available on the WonderLab website at

http://wonderlab.org/about-wonderlab/college-student-internships/

Posted: 3/03/2018

Fall 2018 / LING-L214 (Department of Linguistics)
Instructors: Ann Bunger and Sachiko Koyama
MWF 11:15 am-12:05 pm (3 credits)

ANIMAL COMMUNICATION
This course deals with the communication systems of non-human animals, addressing them both on their own terms and in comparison with the major communication system of human animals, Language. The primary focus will be on communication in bees, birds, mice, and primates, though we will also consider other creatures. From the various perspectives of biology, psychology, and linguistics, we will consider what animals might (be able to) communicate about and how they do it in the wild vs. in contact with humans. This course counts toward fulfillment of the CASE S&H Breadth of Inquiry requirement.

Themester.iu.edu

Check back regularly for new updates